Nissan Skyline GTR History – 9th Generation (1993 – 1996)

r33 gtr

Nissan Skyline GT-R History – 9th Generation (1993 – 1998)

Skyline GT-R (1993 : BCNR33

The ninth-generation Skyline (R33) was launched in August 1993, though the GT-R launch was slightly delayed.

Following its display in the autumn of 1993 at the 30th Tokyo Motor Show, it was finally launched in January 1995. This particular vehicle is the prototype displayed at the Tokyo Motor Show; the front and road-wheel design differ from the production model.

Skyline GT-R (1993 : BCNR33

Specifications

Overall length / width / height
4,675/1,780/1,360mm
Wheelbase
2,720mm
Tread (front/rear)
1,480/1,490mm
Curb weight
Over 1,260kg
Engine
RB26DETT (6-cyl. in line, DOHC), 2,568cc
Engine Max. power
405kW (550PS)/7,600rpm
Engine Max. torque
490Nm (50kgm)/6,000rpm
Transmission
5-speed, floor shift
Suspension
Multilink (front & rear)
Brakes
Ventilated disc (front & rear)
Tires (wheels)
265/680-18 (10Jx18)
  • Note:Exhibited at the 1993 Tokyo Motor Show

S 50 – E Series

The R33 series was very similar to its predecessor, the R32 series. The GT-R was continued, as was the optional all-wheel-drive layout of the sedans and coupes. The car was still very sporty, although it had grown a little in size and weight and had thus become less agile. The weight disadvantage was compensated in the engine department though, by the new normally aspirated RB25, a 2.5l inline-6 with 190hp for the GTS-4 and GTS25 versions, and the far more powerful RB25DET, a 2.5l inline-6 turbo with an output of 255hp, which worked in the GTS25t.

The R33 Skyline GT-R

r33 gtr

A heavy burden lay upon the R33’s back when it was introduced in 1995. It’s predecessor had been very successful (almost unbeatable) and anybody hardly thought the new GT-R could possibly improve on the R32’s performance. Surprisingly, the R33 GT-R was better than the old version in almost any way, although it too had gained some weight.

It kept the RB26DETT engine with an unchanged 280hp, but had a broader torque band which made the engine more flexible. Also standard were improved versions of ATTESA-ETS and Super-HICAS.

NISMO 400R and GT-R LM

Nissan stopped competing in the Le Mans after 1990, but NISMO took its place. Their Skyline-based GT car – NISMO GT-R LM – was entered for Le Mans in 1995 and 1996. In 1995, this No.22 car (H. Fukuyama/S. Kasuya) was 10th overall and 5th in its class. It was modified to 2WD (FR) drive, a better choice for heavy vehicles. And unlike the No.23 car, it was powered by a Group N specification engine.

Nissan Skyline GT-R 1995 BCNR33

 

Specifications

Overall length / width / height
4,675/1,880/1,300mm
Wheelbase
2,720mm
Tread (front/rear)
1,560/1,535mm
Curb weight
Over 1,150kg
Engine
RB26DETT (6-cyl. in line, DOHC), 2,568cc
Engine Max. power
Over 297kW (400PS)/7,200rpm
Engine Max. torque
Over 441Nm (45.0kgm)/4,800rpm
Transmission
X-TRAC 6-speed (sequential)
Suspension
Double wishbone (front & rear)
Brakes
Ventilated disc (front & rear)
Wheels (front, rear)
12Jx18, 12.75Jx18
Tires (front, rear)
315/40R18, 335/40R18
  • Note: No.22, placed 10th overall in 1995 Le Mans
    Drive system: 2WD (FR)

NISMO stands for Nissan Motorsports and is the Motorsports division of Nissan which was responsible for the former Group A racing cars, as well as today’s JGTC (All Japan Grand Touring Car Championship) racing cars. Since engine power for production cars is restricted to 280hp in Japan, having a car built by a tuning division is the only way to get over such a regulation. And this is exactly what Nissan did with the 400R in February 1996, a car that was produced in a very limited number of only 99 pieces.

Nissan had been racing the Skyline in the GT1 category of the 24-hours endurance race of Le Mans in 1995 and 1996, so the GT-R LM and the 400R were intended as road-going versions of these race cars. Both got derivatives of the RB26DETT engine, the GT-R LM with 305hp and the 400R with 400hp. Unfortunately only one GT-R LM was built to homologate the car for racing, which is confined to a museum today.

The 400R on the other hand, got an enlarged RB26DETT engine with 2.8l of displacement, the RBX-GT2, a twin-turbo with an astonishing 400hp at 6.800rpm. The engine was not the only similarity with the GT-R though, since both cars were based upon the R33 GT-R V-spec (Victory Specification). But where the GT-R LM only got RWD (like the race-cars), the 400R got further improved GT-R technology, like ATTESA-ETS etc.

Naturally, both car’s inner potency was resembled in their design as well. Each one of them featured bigger wheels, wider spoilers and wheel-arches and lower suspension, to give them a look even more dramatic than the already not too inconspicuous standard GT-R.

The only machines that can enter the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in the GT class are so-called GT cars, based on vehicles approved for use on public roads. Based on the Skyline GT-R, this vehicle was created as an official road car so NISMO could take part in the 1996 Le Mans; it was actually registered in the UK (although never marketed).

Nissan Skyline GT-R 1996 BCNR33

Sport Car / Competition

Specifications

Overall length / width / height
4,675/1,888/1,300mm
Wheelbase
2,720mm
Tread (front/rear)
1,550/1,580mm
Curb weight
1,580kg
Engine
RB26DETT (6-cyl. in line, DOHC), 2,568cc
Engine Max. power
224kW (305PS)/6,500rpm
Engine Max. torque
373Nm (38.0kgm)/4,500rpm
Transmission
5-speed
Suspension
Double wishbone (front & rear)
Brakes
Ventilated disc (front & rear)
Wheels
9.0Jx18 (front & rear)
Tires
265/35R18 (front & rear)
  • Note:24 Hours of Le Mans ’96 official road car
    NISMO GT-R LM